Monday, June 9, 2008

The Theatre Of The Absurd

'It is depressing to realize how vulnerable ordinary citizens are to the machinations of political cabals. Perhaps the only thing that representative Democracy has to recommend it is that it sets up a system of competition between rival groups of politicians. In that way rivals are always 'sending' people against each other and with any luck, tie each other up enough for ordinary life to go on."

-- The Belmont Club

My last post, on Barack Obama, was specifically for a black friend in San Francisco.

He's been inundated with Democratic "chatter" that Obama's going to win a "landslide" victory in November, and didn't know what to think. Impossible, I said, and with the help of YouTube, set about reminding him that San Francisco is an echo chamber that makes Democrats go mad.

I told him that only a party that's blindly determined to ignore what has already occured (and stupidly expects the rest of America to do the same) can think that Obama stands any chance this fall, after the damage Hillary's narcissism has already left him with - not that Obama needed the help.

But, even with Hillary Clinton's last bit of feminist home-wrecking, the Democratic party's in even more trouble than Barack Obama's candidacy - and it's all the Democratic party's own fault.

The Democratic party's coming losses don't have anything to do, specifically, with racism, or sexism - or even politics, really - but nothing less than the inherently gross, and stupid, influence of occult thinking world-wide. And, like the Democratic party, it, too, is coming apart. A kind of great unraveling.

Listen to Salon.com's Camille Paglia, from her paper Cults and Cosmic Consciousness: Religious Vision in the American 1960s on what the "spiritual" roots of the modern Democratic party are:

"Political expression on the Left in the American sixties was split. Radical activists such as Students for a Democratic Society (1960-68) drew their ideology from Marxism, with its explicit atheism. But demonstrations with a large hippie contingent often mixed politics with occultism-magic and witchcraft along with costumes and symbolism drawn from Native American religion, Hinduism, and Buddhism. For example, at the mammoth antiwar protest near Washington, DC, in October 1967, Yippies performed a mock-exorcism to levitate the Pentagon and cast out its demons. Not since early nineteenth-century Romanticism had there been such a strange mix of revolutionary politics with ecstatic nature-worship and sex-charged self-transformation. It is precisely this phantasmagoric religious vision that distinguishes the New Left of the American 1960s from the Old Left of the American 1930s and from France's failed leftist insurgency of 1968, both of which were conventionally Marxist in their indifference or antagonism to religion.

Members of the sixties counterculture were passionately committed to political reform, yet they were also seeking the truth about life outside religious and social institutions. Despite their ambivalence toward authority, however, they often sought gurus-mentors or guides, who sometimes proved fallible. One problem was that the more the mind was opened to what was commonly called "cosmic consciousness" (a hippie rubric of the sixties), the less meaningful politics or social structure became, melting into the Void. Civil rights and political reform are in fact Western ideals: Hinduism and Buddhism, by extinguishing the ego and urging acceptance of ultimate reality, see suffering and injustice as essential conditions of life that cannot be changed but only endured. Alteration of consciousness-"blowing your mind"-became an end or value in itself in the sixties. Drugs remade the Western world-view by shattering conventions of time, space, and personal identity. Unfortunately, revelation was sometimes indistinguishable from delusion."


That's the issue we're left to grapple with, people: a core set of beliefs, built on delusions, that have inspired the Left for decades and has finally backed those that accept delusions as fact (and/or as part of their identity) into a corner.

One by one, almost every belief the Democrats have been running on - not political ideas but "beliefs" - falls apart under closer scrutiny.

There's nothing there. And even worse, even after being reminded they've only won 3 out of the last 10 elections (with two of those wins by one guy who adopted the Right's ideas) the Democratic Party doesn't see the danger to itself - that's why the rest of us have to be on guard for the fallout.

The gnashing of teeth. It's death struggle. The end.

Look, if you can grasp what's been happening - and are willing to accept what NewAge has been trying to do - it's not difficult to see the worst thing Democrats did was buy into the idea they needed to add a religious/spiritual component to their politics. But Bush won, and the Democrats became convinced they knew why, so, by pushing on that open door, and allowing their delusions free reign, the Democrats got tricked into exposing themselves for what they are - occultists - with a world view completely at odds with America's.

Even if the party, or the NewAge movement, doesn't know what they're looking at yet, as I now do, does anyone think the playwright, David Mamet (in his recent paper Why I Am No Longer a 'Brain-Dead Liberal') didn't chose his words very-carefully as he discussed a political "disputation between reason and faith"? Was it an accident that this highly-intelligent man was listening to the the heavily-occult-influenced NPR when the wheels were set in motion for his change? I do not.

Though the Left's "faith" in occult nonsense is strong, reason is winning. And the Democratic Party would be smart to listen to it. An Obama victory is impossible, people.

I know: Democrats/Leftists/NewAgers hate words like "impossible." But that disdain for specific common words - and detachment, specifically, from common sense - is exactly what I'm talking about. It's what started me on my own road to becoming a Republican.

I found myself looking at an older copy of the San Francisco Bay Guardian yesterday (reading old newspapers is a great way to inform yourself on current events) and I got to thinking about my last days as a Democrat when I read Tim Redmond's editorial:

When the ruling on same-sex marriage came down, I was in upstate New York, hanging out with my brother, who runs a small construction outfit in a working-class town. His employees are the people Democratic leaders worry about; a generation ago they were called "Reagan Democrats." They make extremely un-PC jokes and insult each other with terms that would make most San Franciscans cringe.

And you know what? They couldn't possibly care less about same-sex marriage.

"The people in my crew have families to feed and payments to make on their houses," my brother told me. "They don't care who marries who. It's the most ridiculous issue in the world."


Exactly. But can you tell anyone thinks "it's the most ridiculous issue in the world" by listening to the bulk of Leftist media? No. They're so wrapped up in it, it's such a part of their identity, that it has to be earth-shatteringly important to everyone, right? Not really. It never was an issue worth a mention to me.

Those offensive Fuck America parades were always the issue. Having the equally-offensive Gavin Newsom carry the same-sex banner is the issue - not gay people. Gay people do some weird things but that's nothing new.

I remember, during Bush's second election primary, the supposed "red meat" of same-sex marriage was thrown out for liberal consumption. I had a gay friend who, sensing my latent conservatism, asked me if I thought gay marriage was going to happen. I assured him it would ("all men are created equal"?) and knowing this, I told him I was confused by the reaction of the gay community - my fellow Leftists - to what was obviously Karl Rove's tried-and-true political feint: why all the alarm? He didn't have an answer.

As I saw it, raising gay marriage as a political issue - for the second time! - was cause for ridicule, not angry marches. But I couldn't find anyone who agreed with me, and that gave me pause. Did the Left even understand politics? How the game is played effectively? Not just the issues but which ones were important? I concluded they didn't, and my change began.

Like their Fore Fathers, the French, who patterned their revolution after America's but - with the help of occult influences - found their way to the guillotines, the world-wide Left is conditioned to see things backwards. For instance, where I, as a Leftist who's black and from the ghetto, was always trying to find my way to being "normal," what I thought of as a good person, a better person - a mature adult - it never escaped my eyes that my colleagues (occultists one and all, though I didn't recognize it then) were merely trying to find justifications for covering their previous bad behavior - leading them straight to relativism - not anything close to reflection or personal redemption.

I can still see it in how NewAge Leftists diss suburban middle America, while parading the idea we should all be "one people": how can we become one if they're insulting what is essentially the American character? And doesn't the Left act as a parasite on the rest of American society? Killing off that which keeps you alive just won't do.

Or take "no blood for oil." It didn't take me long to realize we're not in Iraq because we have oil interests but that we have oil interests because we've been in Iraq. We've always been engaged in the world, right from the moment the United States told England to back off and fooled France into selling Louisiana cheap. That's a good thing - engaging in the world is exactly what everyone thinks a, friendly, peace-loving nation should do. But, because the NewAge doctrine demands our government be suspect - an enemy of "the people" - there's no way NewAgers can see that bringing Saddam to justice was in everyone's interest. So we get more marches (against the war.) For the wrong thing (oil.) Against the wrong guys (ours.) And at the wrong time (after the war has started.) They still sport bumper stickers from elections long gone - complaining about the economy - while shopping at Whole Foods! Idiots.

So what else could I do? I became a Republican. Because I knew I couldn't reach people who refuse to learn, and (as my divorce made clear) occultists are determined to have their hissy-fit (which has to be much easier to take as a Republican, believe me) so all that's left for America, too, is to watch, wait, and prepare:

This election promises to be a doozy.