Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Whether Charlie Sheen Is Crazy Is A Matter Of Opinion (Whether This Society He's In Is, Is Not)

Damn it, there's just not a lot of NewAge news out there today - we've been looking - but the gremlins are keeping most of it to themselves. We did find this informative letter, which should make Whole Foods a little nervous, considering they're one of the biggest purveyors of the Homeopathy scam in America:
Dear Editor,

One particularly troubling trend in the modern world is the advancement of faith in the supernatural, superstition, and pseudoscience.

This trend is also puzzling, as we live in an age where real information is so readily available. Unfortunately, so is bad information and propaganda.

On Feb. 5, hundreds of people in 23 countries around the world overdosed on homeopathic so-called "remedies" to demonstrate that there's nothing in it.

Homeopathy was simply stated by a German physician named Samuel Hahnemann, who had no evidence and was just making assertions based on primitive and unscientific beliefs about "vibrations" and other nonsense. He asserted that water has "memory," that poisons can cure the symptoms they cause, and that if you dilute a poison by such a degree that there are no molecules of the poison left, somehow this will cure ailments.

Of course, this violates the laws of thermodynamics, as well as the principle of Avogadro's limit in chemistry.

When you buy homeopathic "remedies," you are buying water and/or sugar. Nothing more. And yet, pharmacies sell those sugar pills alongside real remedies. Shame on them! If someone forgoes real medical treatment in favour of this superstition, they may well die.
And die they do! Don't take our word for it, here's a confession from someone who believes in it:
Just what is it that makes so many people so angry about homeopathy? I’ve been using it on and off for years — arnica tablets for when the kids fall over, a magic box of special remedies which helped cure my hay-fever. I’ve always thought it was something harmless, something all of us did now and again.

Apparently not, though. In the past few months, whenever I’ve mentioned my guilty homeopathy secret to friends, it’s as if I’ve confessed to a penchant for child sacrifice.

‘What?’ the general reaction has been. ‘Don’t you realise all homeopaths are charlatans; their remedies are nothing more than sugar pills; they’re a drain on the NHS; they’ve resulted in the deaths of gullible innocents all over the world?’
Now why would any "follower" let a little thing like "the deaths of gullible innocents all over the world" come between them and their magic water? It's perfectly natural to ignore death for water, right? Of course it is.

Doesn't everybody know kings and queens have been using Homeopathy for 200 years? That's before there was really even medicine!

After our Charlie Sheen post on Alcoholics Anonymous, we were reminded AA's an evil that's been around for 80 years, but so what?

A cult is a cult is a cult is a cult - how long any particular cult has been around doesn't matter. It still should give you the creeps - as it does Charlie Sheen.

The point, to us, is that after Charlie Manson, David Koresh, Jim Jones, and all the rest, cults (and cultish thinking) have been accepted into mainstream American thought to such an extent that now, when they kill, nobody thinks that cults have anything to do with it - because cults are part of the fabric of our society. When's the next time Oprah will have a Scientologist on her show/network?

When's the next time Oprah will offer a Scientologist their own show - like she did Kirstie Alley?

Why, this cult business is happening to such an extent that even doctors, rather than saving our lives, are fighting for their own against it.

But don't be fooled - we're all being made fools of by these people - get this:
"I think it's a scam," said Jeremy Adler. "I really do."

Adler's claims of a scam come after working for three months as the manufacturing manager at a Seattle company called Biomed Comm. The company makes and sells a variety of homeopathic remedies advertised as treatments for autism, menopausal symptom relief, and boosters of immune systems and energy.

Last week the State Department of Health ordered the company and it's founder and CEO Barbara Brewitt, PhD to cease and desist her making and selling of drugs without a license. They also directed her to stop "posing as a medical doctor."

Adler is the whistleblower who started the investigation that led to the Department of Health action. He tells KOMO 4 News he still stands behind those accusations.

"The comment was made once that we don't care what the government says because we're homeopathic," he said Brewitt told him and other employees. "We can make this stuff in a bathtub if we want to."

FDA regulations are different for the makers of homeopathic remedies where the active ingredients are markedly diluted in their final medicinal form. "In clinical studies, patients have reported increased memory, focus and energy, stronger heart and immune systems, relief from stress and headaches, weight loss, increased muscle mass and improved sleep, among other factors," it says on the Biomed Comm website. "Biomed's cell signalers are being taken by autism and HIV (AIDS virus) patients as well as baby boomers who want to stave off aging. "

The Department of Health ordered Brewitt to immediately "stop her unlicensed practice of manufacturing drugs," saying that they do not have the necessary federal approval.

Adler, who says he was hired to help establish a small manufacturing facility in Woodinville, says many of the medicines were mixed by Brewitt herself in her own kitchen as she chanted over a crystal bowl.

"She told all of us the magic is in the chanting and the crystal bowl," said Adler. "And that's what caused everything to work was the energy from the crystal bowl."
Folks, by allowing these NewAge "ancient teachings" to flourish within our modern society, we've slipped further away from reality than Charlie Sheen ever could - no matter how many drugs he's done.

It can even be said that, by mentioning the cult of AA in his ravings, he's made an important contribution to getting us back on track.

And the sooner we come to terms with that, the better off we all will be.

Especially if anyone's serious about wanting to "help" the likes of Good Time Charlie.