Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Alternative Medicine: Back To The (Nazi) Future

"Yes, there were some bizarre strains of pseudoscience in Nazi science. Yes, Nazis were prone to be enamored of naturopathy and homeopathy, which they viewed as more "German" or 'volkish.' Yes, Nazis purged Jews ruthlessly from their universities and viewed science that they did not like as "Jewish science" and therefore degenerate and not truly science. Even more bizarre, what Nazis considered "Jewish science" could be science that you might not guess. For instance, German physicists, lead by Philipp Lenard and Johannes Stark, didn't like Albert Einstein's theory of relativity because Einstein was Jewish. They went so far as to label relativity 'Jewish physics.'"

-- Orac, looking into the wonders of Nazism - including mentioning "Doctor" Robert Wohlfahrt's specialty, homeopathy - for his blog Respectful Insolence. (That's the good "Doctor" Josef Mengele in the photo, above.)

"The more you study Rogers’ work, the more you see that substance is lacking. Any competent referee outside nursing would judge the overall quality of nursing research as pathetic. Nursing theory, as we have seen, is built on undefined jargon and unfalsifyable hypotheses, it is a structure of self-perpetuating myths taken on faith by its practitioners. Nursing theory has become a home for new-age fallacies, "alternative medicine", and hyperbole. Unlike science, nursing theory has no built-in mechanisms for rejecting falsehoods, tautologies, and irrelevancies."

-- Jef Raskin (deceased inventor of the Macintosh computer) looking into "the paranormal and crackpot scientific theories being taught and personality cults flourishing" around Martha Rogers, "Nursing Theory", and Therapeutic Touch - which includes Karine Anne Brunck's specialty, Reiki - at the Jef Raskin Center.

Rogers is famous for saying she was promoting "women's science" (as opposed to "men's science" or "Jewish science").

And now, check out the credentials of the people at this health care company, Lynx Care. One word:

Whoa.